Barley and the glycemic index

Barley and gluten

Barley fights diabetes
Barley is a nutrition powerhouse
Get the facts on fat, cholesterol and heart health
Barley lowers cholesterol

Barley health claim fact sheet

Barley health claim - FDA final rule
Barley and fiber
How does barley fiber content compare?
Here's what you need to know about barley and whole grains

Barley nutritional analysis

 

Barley and the glycemic index

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the glycemic index (GI) measures how foods containing carbohydrates raise blood glucose.  Carbohydrate-containing foods are ranked on the glycemic index according to how they compare to a reference food which is either glucose or white bread. 

Glucose or white bread is given a GI of 100.  Carbohydrate-containing foods are typically ranked high GI (70 or more), medium GI (56-69) and low GI (55 or less).  A food with a high GI raises blood glucose more than a food with a medium or low GI.  Barley is considered a low GI food. 

The ADA emphasizes that if you are concerned about diabetes it’s important to follow a meal plan that fits your personal preferences and lifestyle, and that will help you reach your overall goals for managing blood glucose.  Using the GI may be helpful in “fine-tuning” blood glucose management when combined with carbohydrate counting.

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Barley and gluten

Does barley contain gluten?  Yes. Gluten is a type of protein and is recognized for its ability to help baked goods rise.  On average, barley contains about 5% to 8% gluten. If you are concerned about gluten, check with your health care provider for more information.

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Barley fights diabetes

 

According to the American Diabetes Association, type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes affect over 80 million Americans (Source: National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014). Health and nutrition professionals remind us, however, that this disease can be controlled and even prevented.  It’s a matter of making some simple but important lifestyle choices including losing weight, increasing physical activity and adding plenty of whole grain, high fiber foods such as barley to the daily diet.  Read more

 

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Barley is a nutrition powerhouse

As cereal grains go, barley is a winner when it comes to good nutrition.  This centuries-old grain is packed with fiber, contains important vitamins and minerals, is slim on fat, and, like all plant products, cholesterol-free.  Read more

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Get the facts on fat, cholesterol and heart health

And how barley fits into the picture ... Health and nutrition professionals say a heart-healthy diet should include plenty of fiber and limited amounts of saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol. What’s the connection between heart disease and foods containing fiber, fat and cholesterol? What foods should be included in a heart-healthy diet and which should be limited? Read more here for all the facts.

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Barley lowers cholesterol

Laboratory and animal studies around the world have yielded promising results regarding barley’s potential health benefits.  Now, data from human clinical trials bolster past findings and show a significant correlation between barley consumption and cholesterol reduction.  Read more

 

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Barley and fiber

We’ve all heard it: Eat more fiber. Health and nutrition professionals recommend eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grains, due in part to the healthful high-fiber nature of these foods. So what is fiber? What exactly does it do to promote good health? How can you incorporate fiber into your family favorites? Read on for all the answers.

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How does barley fiber content compare?

Health and nutrition professionals say adult women should eat about 25 grams of fiber and adult men should eat about 38 grams of fiber each day.  The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 continue to place a significant emphasis on eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grains because they are nutrient-rich foods and because they are excellent choices when it comes to fiber consumption. But not all foods are created equal when it comes to fiber.

In the world of grains, barley ranks high as a fiber choice. See how a half-cup serving of cooked pearl barley compares to other grains:

Total dietary fiber per ½-cup serving cooked:
Pearl barley – 3 grams

Amaranth - 2.6 grams

Quinoa - 2.6 grams
Brown long-grain rice – 1.75 grams
White medium-grain rice –0.3 gram

Source: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 27

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Here's what you need to know about barley and whole grains

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 continue to put a major emphasis on eating whole grains. What is a whole grain? Is barley considered whole grain? How can you tell? Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to know. Read more

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Barley nutritional analysis

Pearl barley, raw

Pearl barley, cooked

Barley flour

Source: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 27

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