What is barley?
Where is barley grown in the US?
Is barley grown in other parts of the world?
How much barley is produced in the US?

USDA production figures for barley
How is barley typically used?
Barley information links

What is barley?
Barley is a cereal grain. In botanical terms, barley belongs to the Poacea family, the Triticae tribe and the Hordeum genus. All cultivated barley belongs to the Hordeum vulgare L. genus.

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Where is barley grown in the US?
Barley is a short-season, early maturing crop grown commercially in both irrigated and in dry land environments. Because this grain adapts well to different types of environments, it is grown in many regions throughout the United States. In fact 27 states in the US grow barley to some extent. Major producing states, in descending order of production, include North Dakota, Idaho, Montana, Washington, Colorado, Wyoming, Virginia, Minnesota, Maryland, South Dakota, Oregon and Utah.

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Is barley grown in other parts of the world?
Yes. As a matter of fact, barley is the fourth largest grain crop after wheat, rice and corn. It is grown in many different countries throughout the world. Other major producers include Australia, Canada, Germany, Russia and Ukraine.

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How much barley is produced in the US?
Between 1994 and 2003, US barley production averaged nearly 320 million bushels per year, with an estimated annual value of nearly $760 million as a raw agricultural commodity.
Source: National Barley Growers Association

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How is barley typically used?
Barley is used commercially for animal feed, to produce malt (an important ingredient in beer production), for seed and for human food applications. Approximately 51 percent of the barley crop consumed in the US is used for animal feed. Forty-four percent is used for malt production, 3 percent as seed and 2 percent for food products. In addition to domestic use of barley, exports of the grain averaged about $155 million for barley and its milled products, $44 million for malt and malt extracts and $269 million for beer between 1991 and 2000.
Source: National Barley Growers Association

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Barley information links
We invite you to visit these Web sites to learn more about the barley producers, allied industries and related associations who are responsible for growing, processing and marketing this healthful and versatile cereal grain.

National Barley Foods Council member organizations
Idaho Barley Commission
Montana Wheat and Barley Committee
North Dakota Barley Council
Oregon Grains Commission
Washington Grain Commission

Barley associations
American Malting Barley Association
National Barley Growers Association
US Grains Council

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